Just a quick update on a couple of the amazing workshop leaders we have lined up to share their expertise at the 2015 Philadelphia Writers’ Conference, June 12th, 13th and 14th, 2015 in Philadelphia.

Author, speaker, small business expert and overall dynamo, Melinda Emerson, a.k.a., @SmallBizLady will be teaching Social Media for Writers.

Melinda’s wildly successful book, BECOME YOUR OWN BOSS IN 12 MONTHS, catapulted her to the forefront of the small business conversation during one of the worst recessions in history.

Melinda’s tireless speaking schedule and social media presence, anchored by her weekly #SmallBizChat on Twitter, has established her as one of the leaders among the newest wave of media savvy authors helping people all across the country achieve their dreams. Click here to learn more about Melinda.

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Suzanne Palmieri is the inspirational author of THE WITCH OF LITTLE ITALY, THE WITCH OF BELLA DONNA BAY, and the forthcoming, THE WITCH OF BOURBON STREET (May 2015) under her own name, and EMPIRE GIRLS & I’LL BE SEEING YOU as Suzanne Hayes, will be teaching our novel track.

We are thrilled to bring Suzanne’s energy and enthusiasm to our 2015 conference! Click here to learn more about Suzanne.

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Quick and Easy Promotion Hints from Alice Wootson

by Jim Knipp on August 25, 2014

Congratulations!  You finished your manuscript. You edited it more times than you want to remember, but your work isn’t over once you finish your writing.  It’s not even over over once you find an editor who agrees to release your book, because once your book is close to the release date, more work is needed. How will you let people know your book is available? Here are some easy suggestions:
1. Give out handouts or bookmarks; something to let potential readers know the title, the release date, what the book is about and where they can get a copy. Give these to family, friends, acquaintances and anybody who will accept one.
2. schedule book signings
3. meet with book clubs or groups of readers
4. offer to present workshops or meet with readers at libraries and private homes
It’s important that you brainstorm for ways to set your book apart from others on the bookshelves. There are a lot of books available. You want people to choose yours.
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photo-1As a new semester approaches, I’m thinking again about how I will balance my work as writing teacher with my “real” work as a writer.

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DPK HeadshotJust before this year’s Philadelphia Writers’ Conference, I was reminded of experiences from my youth that helped to shape the poetry I have been writing most of my life. Having grown up in a family of musicians, much of my creative process is related in one way or another to music. The episodes I began thinking about happened on a couple of family trips to the music festival at Tanglewood, Massachusetts and during three summers spent at the “American” school for music, art and architecture in Fontainebleau, France. All involved the convening of people actively involved in the arts – as performers, composers, conductors, visual artists, architects, art historians and critics.

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Don’t Give Up! By Joe O’Loughlin

by Jim Knipp on July 28, 2014

Long time PWC board member and treasurer Joe O’Loughlin has been in this business for a loooooong time, and he was kind enough to share some of his moments of inspiration and things that have driven him.  Read more after the break!

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David Wilson Reports on ThrillerFest IX!

by Jim Knipp on July 20, 2014

Wilson PhotoPWC Board Member David Wilson is a man of many hats – including Vice President of Special Projects for International Thriller Writers.   Read his report of the 9th Annual ThrillerFest, held last week (July 8th through 12th).  See what he has to say after the break!

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“All the arts are brothers; each one is a light to the others” – Voltaire

Susan-Photo-ColorThe Rhythm and Verse Salon is a literary, music and arts salon, a community, a gathering place where both featured guests and our participants share in a variety of voices, genres and styles of artistic expression.   The Rhythm and Verse Salon welcomes lovers of literature, music, theater, art and conversation.

We have built Rhythm and Verse in the tradition of renowned cultural salons of the 17th through 20th centuries, we gather together for inspiration and conversation. Our salon is designed as a convivial forum for sharing your – our guests’ artistic creations – even your embryonic expressions within an intimate and welcoming atmosphere. And, if our guests would like, think Paris, 1920’s . . . Gertrude Stein’s living room. Entrez-vous, after the break!

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LisaLMulti-talented Philadelphia Writers’ Conference Board member Lisa Lutwyche talks about how she added playwright and director to her repertoire.  Read more after the break!

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len and eileenNews from PWC  il Presidente Eileen D’Angelo regarding upcoming Mad Poets Society events.

Check it out after the break!

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William Lashner Opening Remarks: A Deeper View!

by Jim Knipp on June 23, 2014

As I mentioned in last week’s post, I didn’t have the opportunity to hear William Lashner’s opening remarks and could only offer passing commentary.  Luckily, fellow board member Ed Krizek was there for the whole thing.  Ed was kind enough to put together a great summary that I’d like to share.

Opening speaker Bill Lashner discussed the path that led him to become a writer and about his passion for writing. Using The story of Herman Melville’ s life and the writing of ” Moby Dick,” Lashner spoke of how great works can be misunderstood when introduced to the reading public, but emphasized that this fact does not make them less important or great. He cautioned the crowd to separate the “business” of writing from one’s actual writing;  urging everyone to do his/her best work regardless of commercial success. Lashner chose to be a writer because he loves writing. His message can be summed up as “write because you love it and always produce your best work”. Commercial success may or may not come but an author can find satisfaction and fulfillment in the act of writing nonetheless, and possibly produce a great piece of writing!

Thanks Ed for the great review.  And thanks again all for your support of the PWC.  Already looking ahead to 2015!

 

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